Paid Commutes, Lighter Repair, and HuffPost Hate

Dear Brian,
European Court is currently considering that “Time taken to travel from Home-To-Work & Work-To-Home ” should be included in daily working time of every individual employee. What do you think?

This is an interesting concept, and I’m not familiar with the European Court’s specific rules and safeguards, but I do see a couple issues with it.

1) What’s to stop me from clocking in, then having the company pay me to stop somewhere to get something to eat, run a few errands, and then blame it on traffic?

2) This will likely encourage work-from-home positions, as these employees will be doing the most work for the money. If I have to pay someone for 60 minutes of drive time where they’re not being productive vs someone I can work for that 60 minutes, it’s an obvious choice who I’ll hire.

3) I would take public transportation, as it takes longer and I’ll get paid more to do nothing. Can the employer force me to work while on my commute since they’re paying me?

4) If I’m on the clock and get in an accident on my way to work, is the company liable? The designation in the U.S. for this is whether or not they were on the clock acting in an official capacity. So, if I’m being paid for my commute, does commuting to and from work become part of my work duties for liability purposes?

5) If I am forced (or, at the very least, strongly encouraged) to work during my commute, it’ll cost quite a bit for companies to set up VPN’s and secure mobile devices for work purposes. Will increasing the volume of workers working on the go increase the costs associated with lost or compromised equipment?

6) If I’m on the clock, does that give my employer the right to install a GPS device in my vehicle to track where I’m at while working?

These are just some questions that came up in my initial reaction. I’m sure there are many more questions that need to be addressed in order to implement such a policy on such a large level.

All that being said, I’m totally for it – while I don’t have a commute, schedule, or employer (I’m a freelancer and only have clients), I’ve had quite a few jobs with 30-60 minute commutes each way. Being paid for the drive would just barely cover the cost of fuel, but it’s a step in the right direction.

With labor unions being systematically dismantled worldwide, it’s absolutely necessary to start implementing more laws that put the power back into the hands of workers.

Dear Brian,
How do you change the fuse on a cigarette lighter?

I assume you mean the wick.

In a Zippo lighter, this is easy – remove the inner piece from the shell, unscrew the bottom, and feed the wick through the hole.

Bics have no wick, working similar to butane lighters.

If that’s not what you’re talking about, then perhaps you mean the flint, which is the piece the wheel rubs against to spark the flame.

Here’s a diagram:

If the spark wheel gets stuck, the problem is the flint is gone and the wheel is now rubbing against the flint spring. When metal hits metal, it locks, which is why you need oil in an automobile engine.

Dear Brian,
What is the book symbol on Tinder?

Tinder connects with Facebook to show whether you and your potential match have any mutual friends (the human symbol) or shared interests (the book) on Facebook.

If you want to attract more matches on Tinder, it’s a good idea to start liking more things on Facebook.

Dear Brian,
Why is Huffington Post widely hated?

Why is Huffington Post widely hated ? One of the most notable instances is Stephen Colbert’s view on Huff Po. There seem to be other instances of such emotion as well.

http://techcrunch.com/2011/02/17…

On his show tonight Colbert, frustrated with all the free content Arianna Huffington has been glomming off “The Colbert Report” and others, announced that he would build his own site and call it “The Colbuffington Re-Post.”  The Colbuffington Re-Post has“everything you love about the Huffington Post because it is the Huffington Post with a new border around it that says the Colbuffington Re-Post.”

Arianna Huffington is a known liberal, and quite a few journalists working for HuffPost lean liberal as well. However, the reputation of HuffPost for being liberal is basically because life has a known liberal bias.

HuffPost is hated for a variety of reasons, and here are a few:

1. They’re the largest/most trafficked blog on the Internet.

2. They often feature unpopular opinions with the intent of opening a conversation.

3. The site is a popular platform for activists and fringe-thinkers to publish their work.

4. Mixed in with the political commentary are fluff pieces about bacon, kittens, and viral videos.

5. They only pay a small, core group of content creators.

6. If you ask How do you become a writer for the Huffington Post?, their official company account explains how to give them your content for free, not how to become a paid writer for them.

7. Comments are moderated, and identity verification gets more and more strict.

8. The HuffPost community is overly sensitive and someone gets butthurt in the comments of pretty much every article.

9. This article: If Pop Stars Were Breakfast Cereals: A Delicious Analysis (PHOTOS)

10. All the slideshows.

11. They mock Taco Bell, until the Taco Bell CEO is on HuffPost Live. Then they’ll try to convince you to eat Taco Bell in order to make money, knowing they’d never touch it off camera.

12. They use Blogger instead of WordPress.

Brian Penny versability whistleblower anonymous playgroundBrian Penny is a former Business Analyst and Operations Manager at Bank of America turned whistleblower, troll, and freelance writer. His work has appeared in High Times, Fast Company, The Street, DumbLittleMan, Hardcore Droid, and Cannabis Now.
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Brian Penny is a former Business Analyst and Operations Manager at Bank of America turned whistleblower, troll, and freelance writer.

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