CES 2020 Is in Full Swing Showcasing the Future of Tech The biggest event in Las Vegas is wowing everyone this week with everything cool and strange.

CES 2020 is the biggest event in the tech industry. Anybody who wants to be anybody in the tech industry shows up to make an appearance, give (or attend) a speech, network, and put on a big show for the press about new consumer and enterprise technologies and trends.

Because it’s the first event of a new decade, CES 2020 is especially well-attended, with over 175,000 attendees and 4,500 exhibitors representing over 160 countries. Here are some highlights

CTA President and CEO Gary Shapiro welcomes Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian for his keynote. It’s the first major airline to make an appearance at CES, showing the strength of the show in this new decade.

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Here’s a shot of CES attendees lining up for passes. We have a great guide on how to attend CES if you’re ever interested. It’s closed to the public, but journalists, investors, and industry insiders gallore attend.

Sony was hoping to stir up excitement for its PlayStation 5, but the lack of any reveal beyond changing the 4 to a 5 left the Twitterverse in stitches.

Massive 8K HDR screens are the big sell of CES 2020, with companies like TCL showcasing a wide variety of 8K-certified TVs.

Even on the software side, the UHD Alliance showcased Filmmaker Mode, which makes screen settings easier to apply to content and viewed by different devices. This will make ultra high-definition (UHD) devices much easier to introduce to the broader consumer market.

As always, CES has constant crowds throughout the entire cities of Las Vegas and Paradise, Nevada.  Here are some key findings for marketers in from MediaLink and the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) at CES 2020.

Setting up for CES involves a lot of work from various crews. These exhibits are like massive movies sets. Check out CES Unveiled 2019 and pics from the 2019 exhibit floor.

At CES Unveiled 2020 press and industry analysts were given an exclusive, early-access preview to all the hotest gadgets being announced at the show. There were some definite wierd prototypes spanning a wide range of interests.

We tasted the first Impossible Burger at its launch in 2019 at Thought for Your Penny (Thanks, Amy for forcing us!). It’s actually great, and the surge in popularity that followed was unexpected. Now a staple in Burger King’s “Impossible” Whopper, the company unveiled Impossible Pork for 2020.

Samsung showed up with some insanse Neon chat bots. These hyper-realistic (but still computer-genrerated and fictional) people can act as virtual friends in the future, making AI a lot more realistic than we’re used to today.

Samsung Consumer Electronics Division President and CEO Hyun-Suk Kim also showed off a range of consumer electronics sure to be popular when they hit shelves in 2020.

Daimler’s Chairman of the Board of Management Ola Kallenius has a simple question for the crows, as he unveils the brand’s latest concept car, which looks straight out the future.

Boating company Brunswick represented the boating industry at CES, something that’s been missing from the event in past years. They make it clear the marine and boating industries are technology-focused.

Intel’s presentation lacked zest, although Zotac, Project Athena, and a few other devices were cool but overall viewed as lackluster by the general media.

Hyundai unveiled a flying car concept, along with some cool gear that got the crowd more excited.

Taiwain’s startup community continues showcasing rapid development in technology. It’s always an impressive stop for anyone going to CES.

AMD far outshined Intel when it unveiled its Ryzen 7 4000-series processors, along with a slew of hardware focused on gamers and creators. These are the two professional groups who need the most advanced GPU and CPU power.

Toyota shifted its focus outside the car and on smart cities. This “woven city” is what it views as the future of condensed cities in Japan.

Bosch unveiled its Virtual Viser, smart home support for Apple Homekit, and more.

Qualcom unveiled the many platforms using its chips, and focuses on autonomous driving in a 5G world.

Hisense unveiled several new technologies in its fancy laser TVs, including dual-cell LCD, ULED Quantom Dot, and self-rising mechanics for that extra bit of flair.

Monster introduced its new Multilink Bluetooth technology at CES. It’s meant to make audio sound better in our inevitable shift to wireless headphones and speakers.

Proctor and Gamble (P&G) always has a presence at CES, and 2020 was no different. The company showcased a new electric toothbrush, a robot that carries Charmin toilet paper, and more in its LIfeLab at CES.

LG showed off a $60,000 rollable TV that stunned those in attendance. It also had practically bezeless OLED 4K smart TVs with AI ThinQ and OLED 8K smart TVs up to 88 inches.

CES always has its share of speakers. After skipping out last year, FCC chair Ajit Pai showed up with reinforcements to try and look cool and hip for the new decade.

Presidential daugther Ivanka Trump followed suit, showing up for a conversation with the CTA about the role of technology in society.

C/Net is continuing hosting expert panels that are a little more digestible, and coverage from Wired, The Verge, Digital Trends, Engadget, Ars Technica, and other reputable tech outlests makes CES much more palatable.

It looks like 2020 will be a great year for consumer and enterprise electronics. Both hardware and software are being infused with new ideas, and everyone from Hollywood to the White House and everywhere across the globe, wants in on the action.

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Dr. Brian Penny is a former Business Analyst and Operations Manager at Bank of America turned whistleblower, troll, and freelance writer. You can find his work in Cracked, High Times, HuffPost, Lifewire, Forbes, Fast Company, and dozens of other places, although much of it is no longer under his name. Dr. Penny loves annoying fake media.

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